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Landscapes: An Essay On Oriental Landscapes Part 7

Added on by Bill.

In the previous post I combined multiple elements together, including fog, mountains, and the elongated portrait format.

Water is also an important and recurring element in Chinese Landscapes.  But as I see it, it is one that highlights flow or movement within the frame, along with other elements that provide shape.  In this example I have combined many of the elements from the previous shots (mountains, flog) with shape. The round shapes of the mountains provide a smoothness and tranquility.  The inherent sense of perspective derived from a line cutting the tops of the mountains going from left to right. The foreground trees on the left complement the line of the mountain tops with a diagonal line across the tops of the trees. To the western eye these lines travel from left to right in a downward direction.  The bird flying across the river, left to right, adds a nice touch.  

River Li, China; May 26, 2008; Leica D-Lux 3, ISO 100, 25.2mm, f/4.9, 1/500 sec

River Li, China; May 26, 2008; Leica D-Lux 3, ISO 100, 25.2mm, f/4.9, 1/500 sec

In creating this picture I used:

  • Lightroom: to establish the exposure, to dodge and burn (lighten / darken) the mountains to enhance the fog and thus the sense of depth; contrast and exposure to reduce the detail and further enhance the shapes in the picture
  • Nik Silver Efex: to convert to black & white

Landscapes: An Essay On Oriental Landscapes Part 6

Added on by Bill.

In the previous post I explored the use of fog or clouds.  Chinese Landscape Art often combines clouds with the vertical landscape. In this shot I have tried to capture the flow of the clouds between the mountains. The stretched format provides more room to define the flow.

Zhangjiajie China, May 23, 2008; Leica D-Lux 3, ISO 100, 25.2mm, f/4.9, 1/200 sec

Zhangjiajie China, May 23, 2008; Leica D-Lux 3, ISO 100, 25.2mm, f/4.9, 1/200 sec

In creating this Picture I used:

  • Lightroom: to establish the exposure
  • Nik Silver Efex: to convert to black and white
  • Adobe Photoshop Elements: to add my seal

Landscapes: An Essay On Oriental Landscapes Part 5

Added on by Bill.

In the previous post I began exploring mountain portraits.  Chinese Landscape Art often includes fog or clouds.  Clouds offer a means to isolate: foreground elements from background; peer elements from each other. Clouds can have a simplifying effect by increasing the empty space, hiding complexity or breaking a larger possibly complex subject into smaller possibly simpler ones. The clouds can be used to provide paths for the eye to follow or skip. Clouds can add mystery.

Zhangjiajie China, May 23, 2008; Leica D-Lux 3, ISO 100, 23.2mm, f/4.9, 1/250 sec

Zhangjiajie China, May 23, 2008; Leica D-Lux 3, ISO 100, 23.2mm, f/4.9, 1/250 sec

In creating this picture I used:

  • Lightroom: to establish the exposure 
  • Nik Silver Efex: to convert to black and white
  • Adobe Photoshop Elements: to add my seal

Landscapes: An Essay On Oriental Landscapes Part 4

Added on by Bill.

In the previous posting I explored combining layering and silhouette in the same shot.  I also included adding colour to simulate the traditional silk surface.  

Another aspect of Chinese Landscape Art is the portrait view of a mountain, almost as a vertical panorama. In this example I explore the style that combines two elements: [1] a vertical panorama [2] the combination of detail and abstraction or highly textured and lack there of.  The elements I captured here were the relatively detailed foreground with the less detailed background. The texture in the background was understated by over exposing it. The portrait was exaggerated by cropping to 16:9.

Huangshan China, May 17, 2008; Leica D-Lux 3, ISO 100, 9.3mm, f/4.5, 1/160sec

Huangshan China, May 17, 2008; Leica D-Lux 3, ISO 100, 9.3mm, f/4.5, 1/160sec

In creating this picture I used:

  • Lightroom: to establish the exposure
  • Nik Viveza: to brighten the colours.  I sometimes do this prior to converting to black and white to get a better conversion
  • Nik Silver Efex: to convert to black and white
  • Adobe Photoshop Elements: to add my seal.

Landscapes: An Essay On Oriental Landscapes Part 3

Added on by Bill.

In the previous posting I explored the use of layering as used in orietnal art to develop a sense of depth.  

In this example I apply both silhouttes and layering in the same shot.  The silhouette of the pines is layered in front of the mountains. The pines are offset from the mountains by dodging (lightening) around the edges.  As before I used a yellowish hue to provide a sense of the silk material that was often used and to warm up the picture. 

Huangshan China, May 17, 2008; Leica D-Lux 3, ISO 100, 19.2mm, f/6.3, 1/1000 sec

Huangshan China, May 17, 2008; Leica D-Lux 3, ISO 100, 19.2mm, f/6.3, 1/1000 sec

In creating this picture I used:

  • Lightroom: to establish the exposure; use of paint brush to dodge and burn valleys and mountain edges respectively
  • Nik Define: to reduce noise
  • Nik Viveza: to brighten colours. I sometime do this prior to converting to black and white to get a better conversion
  • Nik Silver Efex: to convert to black and whote
  • Adobe Photoshop Elements: to add my seal